Disease Information for Rift Valley fever

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Clinical Manifestations
Signs & Symptoms
Low Blood Pressure
Tachycardia/Fast heart rate
Bleeding from venipuncture sites/needle stick
Bruising/Ecchymosis
Convalescent Desquamation palms/soles
Erythematous generalized rash
Facial erythema
Facial flushing/Beet red
Fever and Rash
Flushing
Hemorrhagic rash
Hemorrhagic/Confluent ecchymotic rash
Macular rash
Non-pruritic rash
Petechiae/Petechial rash
Rash
Rash, macular/maculopapular or morbilliform
Acute spontaneous/widespread bleeding/signs
Bleeding from all orifices
Excessive/easy bruising tendency
Bleeding from mouth/oral blood
Bleeding gums
Lymphadenopathy Systemic
Cough
Cough Dry Non-productive
Epistaxis, severe/persistent
Acutely ill patient/signs
Constitutional symptoms
Fever
Fever Febrile Possible
Fever in Immigrants
Fever, high
Fever, saddleback type
Flu-Like Syndrome
High body temperature
Toxic and Febrile Septic
Bleeding from eyes
Clinical Presentation & Variations
Presentation/Fever Immigrant Recent Home country visit
Presentation/Fever recent Travel Long visit return
Presentation/Fever Rash Prostration Abrupt
Presentation/Eye Oral GI GU Hemorrhage
Disease Progression
Course/Acute
Course/Acute only
Course/Untreated mortality high
Demographics & Risk Factors
Exposure Factors
Exposure/Cattle/reservoir/vector
Exposure/Cows/calves
Exposure/Mosquito vector
Exposure/Terrorist biologic weapon agents
Exposure/Terrorist/Chemical-biological weapon (CBW)
Travel, Geographic & Climate Related Factors
Residence/travel/Africa
Population Group
Population/Immigrant population
Event, Activity, Behavioral & Seasonal Factors
Event/Mass exposure/community illness/death
Laboratory Tests
Abnormal Lab Findings (Non Measured)
Acute inflammatory markers elevated (Lab)
Renal function abnormalities (Lab)
Right Shift (Viral) Differential Smear (Lab)
Abnormal Lab Findings - Increased
D Dimer Levels (Lab)
Platelet count (Lab)
Prothromin Fragments
Associated Diseases & Rule outs
Rule Outs
Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever/Machupo
Dengue hemorrhagic fever
Ebola virus/disease
Lassa fever
Yellow fever
Associated Disease & Complications
Bleeding diathesis/hemorrhagic diathesis
Bleeding Tendency
Coma/Unconscious
Encephalitis, secondary
Epistaxis/nosebleed
Hallucinations
Hemorrhagic fever syndrome
Hyperpyrexia
Hypotension
Phlebovirus infection
Rift valley fever
Thrombocytopenia
Thrombocytosis
Viral hemorrhagic fevers
Disease Mechanism & Classification
Specific Agent
AGENT/Aerosolized bioterror weapon
AGENT/Arthropod bourne/vector virus (ex)
AGENT/Arthropod/acarid/tick bourne infection (ex)
AGENT/Phlebovirus (ex)
AGENT/Virus (category)
Pathophysiology
Pathophysiology/Capillarities/Micro hemorrhagic process
Pathophysiology/Infectious vasculitis/capillaritis
Process
PROCESS/Infection/agent specific (category)
Toxin
TOXIN/CBRNE (Chemical/Biologic Weapons All) potential
Treatment
Other Treatments
TX/Expectant/supportive treatment.
Definition

A febrile hemorrhagic disease resembling dengue; It is caused by a mosquito-borne arbovirus;incubation 3-6 days; major hemorrhagic and hepatitis, moderate encephalitis, absent nephropathy;------------------------------------------------ RIFT VALLEY FEVER (RVF) Rift Valley fever is chiefly a veterinary disease of Sub-Saharan Africa, where intermittent epizootics associated with heavy rainfall cause serious losses of domestic livestock from abortions and death; Humans generally become infected in this setting by direct or aerosol-mediated contact with blood from infected animals as well as by arthropod bite; RVF usually manifests as a self-limited but severe illness characterized by fever, headache, chills, anorexia, myalgia, and prostration; The illness usually lasts 2 to 5 days, and most patients recover without complications; The disease is distinguished by three complications: (a) acute retinitis that can cause permanent decrease in vision and that occurs after the acute illness has subsided in as many as 20% of patients; (b) a severe hemorrhagic disease with hepatic involvement in fewer than 1% of patients; and (c) encephalitis associated with confusion, meningismus, paresis, hallucinations, convulsions, and recrudescence of fever in fewer than 1% of patients-----[Rudolph"s Pediatrics 2002]----------

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External Links Related to Rift Valley fever
Google
Wikipedia
Merck
Images
PubMed (National Library of Medicine)
NGC (National Guideline Clearinghouse)
Medscape (eMedicine)
Harrison's Online (accessmedicine)
NEJM (The New England Journal of Medicine)
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