Disease Information for March fracture

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Clinical Manifestations
Signs & Symptoms
Foot Swelling
Plantar Pain
Ankle Pain
Anterior metatarsalgia
Foot Pain
Heel Pain
Lateral Foot Pain
Limp
Medial Foot/Ankle pain
Midfoot pain
Plantar Heel Pain
Exertion/physical stress relapse/illness/complaint
Disease Progression
Course/Acute
Course/Acute only
Demographics & Risk Factors
Event, Activity, Behavioral & Seasonal Factors
Activity/Jogging/running
Activity/Marching
Laboratory Tests
Abnormal Lab Findings - Increased
URINE Collagen cross-link products
URINE C-Telopeptide (CTx Bone Turnover Marker)
URINE Free deoxypyrodinoline (DPD Bone turnover Marker)
URINE Helicel Peptide (HelP Bone turnover Marker)
URINE N-Telopeptide (NTx Bone turnover Marker)
URINE N-Telopeptide Crosslinks levels
URINE Type-1 Collagen Peptides
Diagnostic Test Results
X-RAY
Xray/Metacarpal fracture
Associated Diseases & Rule outs
Rule Outs
Osteomyelitis
Plantar fasciitis
Associated Disease & Complications
Femoral neck stress fracture
March fracture
Pathologic fractures
Recurrent bone fractures
Stress fracture
Stress fracture Foot Metatarsal
Disease Mechanism & Classification
Class
CLASS/Foot bones/disorder (ex)
CLASS/Skeletal (category)
Process
PROCESS/Activity/occupation/events (ex).
PROCESS/Functional/physiologic (category)
PROCESS/Trauma (category)
PROCESS/Fractures (ex)
Definition

Fractures due to the strain caused by repetitive exercise. They are thought to arise from a combination of muscle fatigue and bone failure, and occur in situations where bone remodeling predominates over repair. The classical stress fracture is the march fracture of military personnel, in which the metatarsal undergoes repeated stress during marching. The most common sites of stress fractures are the metatarsus, fibula, tibia, and femoral neck.

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External Links Related to March fracture
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Wikipedia
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PubMed (National Library of Medicine)
NGC (National Guideline Clearinghouse)
Medscape (eMedicine)
Harrison's Online (accessmedicine)
NEJM (The New England Journal of Medicine)
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