Disease Information for Laryngeal edema

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Clinical Manifestations
Signs & Symptoms
Accessory muscle use with breathing
Apnea In Children
Breath Sounds Decreased
Bronchospasm signs
Cough Acute
Dyspnea
Expiratory stridor or stertor
Gurgling respiration sounds
Noisy Breathing
Noisy Breathing Aged/Elderly
Respiratory excursions decreased
Retraction of intercostal muscles
Shallow breathing
Wheezing
Acute loss of voice/hoarseness
Constriction throat/Pharyngeal dystonia
Difficulty speaking/phonating
Dysphonia
Hoarseness
Hypophonia/Strained/Quiet Voice
Laryngeal pain/Aphonia
Larynx Pain
Odd sounding voice/husky
Soft voice/soft spoken
Stridor (Inspiratory noise)
Stridor infant Child
Voice Alteration
Voice Alteration in Children
Voice Alteration in Elderly
Voice change/disturbance/Unusual
Voice/phonation problems
Clinical Presentation & Variations
Presentation/Wheeze Cough Dyspnea Infant
Diagnostic Test Results
Other Tests & Procedures
Laryngoscopy/Abnormalities
X-RAY
Xray/Subglottic narrowing/lateral neck
Associated Diseases & Rule outs
Rule Outs
Anaphylaxis, generalized
Asthma
Carcinoma, larynx
Croup (tracheobronchitis)
Epiglottitis, acute
Laryngitis, acute
Associated Disease & Complications
Acidosis, respiratory
Airway obstruction
Airway obstruction/Children
Asphyxia/suffocation
Laryngeal stridor
Upper airway Obstruction
Disease Mechanism & Classification
Class
CLASS/Otolaryngology/ENT Specialty Population
CLASS/Laryngeal disorder (ex)
CLASS/Otolaryngology/ENT disorders (ex)
CLASS/Tracheonasal/larynx/pharynx (category)
Pathophysiology
Pathophysiology/Edematous process
Pathophysiology/Glottic obstruction/partial
Pathophysiology/Upper airway narrowing
Process
PROCESS/Allergy/collagen/autoimmune (category)
PROCESS/Reference organ/system (category)
PROCESS/Vegetative-Autonomic/Endocrine (category)
Treatment
Drug Therapy - Indication
RX/Epinephrine (Adrenalin)
SX/Emergency cricothyrotomy
SX/Tracheotomy
Other Treatments
TX/Endotracheal airway.
TX/Intensive care management
TX/Rest Voice Use
Definition

Edema of any region of the larynx from a variety of causes; In the earliest stages it may be difficult to differentiate from infection, although mucosal injection and erythema are found more often in the latter; Allergic edema may result as a response from provocation induced by foods, inhalants, and drugs; The entire respiratory tract or only an isolated portion of the larynx may be affected; Laryngeal edema may also be hereditary; Other possible causes of laryngeal edema include increased capillary pressure due to superior vena cava syndrome, internal jugular vein ligation, lowered plasma osmotic failure induced by renal failure, impaired lymphatic flow, and increased capillary permeability to proteins-------(From Paparella et al, Otolaryngology, 3d ed, p2253)-----------------

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External Links Related to Laryngeal edema
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PubMed (National Library of Medicine)
NGC (National Guideline Clearinghouse)
Medscape (eMedicine)
Harrison's Online (accessmedicine)
NEJM (The New England Journal of Medicine)
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