Disease Information for Histamine release pathophysiology

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Clinical Manifestations
Signs & Symptoms
Plethora/Red face/Ruddy look
Red/erythema skin discoloration
Facial erythema
Facial flushing/Beet red
Flushing
Hot Flushes
Pruritic/itching rash
Pruritis Itching
Nausea
Postprandial status
Vomiting
Warm/Extremities dry/warm to touch
Headache worse with valsalva/Bowel movement
Headache, throbbing, vascular
Headache/worsened by movement
Hot flashes
Disease Progression
Course/Acute
Onset/Abrupt/Sudden
Demographics & Risk Factors
Sex & Age Groups
Population/Adult/all
Laboratory Tests
Abnormal Lab Findings - Increased
Histamine (Lab)
URINE N-Methylhistamine (NMH)
Associated Diseases & Rule outs
Associated Disease & Complications
Gastritis, erosive/corrosive
Red Man Syndrome
Scombroid fish poisoning
Urticaria/hives
Vascular headache
Disease Synergy - Causes
Triggers of mastocytosis crises/abdominal pain
Disease Mechanism & Classification
Drugs
DRUG/Histamine-like toxicity
Pathophysiology
Pathophysiology/Food poisoning/fast onset
Pathophysiology/Vascular dilatation/circulatory collapse
Process
PROCESS/Pathophysiologic disorder (category)
PROCESS/Poison/specific (category)
Treatment
Drug Therapy - Indication
RX/Antihistamine medication
RX/Chlorpheniramine (Chlotrimeton)
Definition

The secretion of histamine from mast cell and basophil granules by exocytosis. This can be initiated by a number of factors, all of which involve binding of IgE, cross-linked by antigen, to the mast cell or basophil"s Fc receptors. Once released, histamine binds to a number of different target cell receptors and exerts a wide variety of effects.

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External Links Related to Histamine release pathophysiology
Google
Wikipedia
Merck
Images
PubMed (National Library of Medicine)
NGC (National Guideline Clearinghouse)
Medscape (eMedicine)
Harrison's Online (accessmedicine)
NEJM (The New England Journal of Medicine)
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