Disease Information for Drug induced Stimulation/Hyperactivity

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Clinical Manifestations
Signs & Symptoms
Brief Blood pressure increase/sign:
High blood pressure/sign
Palpitations/Skipped beats
Sudden pallor
Tachycardia/Fast heart rate
Axillary sweating
Excess Sweating Children
Hyperhidrosis/Chronic sweating excess
Sweating Excess Perspiration
Dry mouth/Mucous membranes
Delirium
Delirium/Agitated delirium
Exaggerated physiologic tremor (14Hz)
Hand tremors
Hypereactive Child
Hypereactive/on exam
Insomnia
Tremor
Tremor,fine
Affect gay/happy inappropriate
Agitation
Euphoria/Elated/'high' behavior/Gaiety
Hyperstimulated/Wakeful
Hypomanic state
Manic behavior
Short attention span
Pallor
Weight Loss
Mydriasis/wide pupils
Demographics & Risk Factors
Established Disease Population
Patient/On Medications long term/ usually
Associated Diseases & Rule outs
Rule Outs
Attention deficit disorder
Gilles de Tourette syndrome
Associated Disease & Complications
Cardiac arrhythmias
Drug induced Agitation/Hyperactivity/Hypomania.
Drug induced Hypertension.
Hypertension
Hypomania
Sleep Fragmentation
Ventricular fibrillation
Ventricular tachycardia/arrest
Xerostomia
Disease Mechanism & Classification
Drugs
DRUG/Reaction to medication/drug induced (ex)
Process
PROCESS/Complicating disorder (ex)
PROCESS/Drug induced disorder (ex)
PROCESS/Medication/Drug (CONFIRM dose/before treatment)
PROCESS/Poisoned organ/system (category)
Toxin
TOXIN/Rave party drug/Youth dating scene (ex)
Definition

Drug-induced Hyperactive hyperstimulated state secondary to medication effect; hypomania, excitement, and agitation and autonomic nervous system stimulation occurs; insomnia is common as well as tachycardia and sympathomimetic effects;best treatment is time WITH discontinuation of drugs and expectant observation

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External Links Related to Drug induced Stimulation/Hyperactivity
Google
Wikipedia
Merck
Images
PubMed (National Library of Medicine)
NGC (National Guideline Clearinghouse)
Medscape (eMedicine)
Harrison's Online (accessmedicine)
NEJM (The New England Journal of Medicine)
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