Disease Information for Dracunculiasis (Guinea worm)

Ads
Clinical Manifestations
Signs & Symptoms
Creeping eruption syndrome
Painful subcutaneous nodules
Subcutaneous swelling migrates
Thigh/Leg Swelling Unilateral Severe
Clinical Presentation & Variations
Presentation/Painful Leg Ulcer Chronic
Disease Progression
Course/Chronic disorder
Course/Chronic only
Demographics & Risk Factors
Recent Event
Recent/local/migrating rash
Laboratory Tests
Abnormal Lab Findings - Increased
Eosinophiles (LAB)
Diagnostic Test Results
Pathology
PATH/Tissue roundworms
X-RAY
Xray/Calcifications Subcutaneous
Xray/Subcutaneous ossification centers/calcification
Xray/Abdominal calcifications/ABD
Xray/Abdominal film abnormalities/ABD/KUB
Xray/Calcifications of soft tissue, multiple
Xray/Muscle calcification
Xray/Soft tissue calcification/muscle/subcutaneous
Xray/Intraorbital calcifications/Head
Associated Diseases & Rule outs
Associated Disease & Complications
Dracunculiasis
Eosinophilia Hypereosinophilia
Urticaria/hives
Leg ulcers
Disease Mechanism & Classification
Specific Agent
AGENT/Micro-crustacean vector/water source
AGENT/Migrating/invading larval forms
AGENT/Parasites (category)
AGENT/Snail vector
AGENT/Tropical infections/diseases
Pathophysiology
Pathophysiology/Larval skin penetration site
Process
PROCESS/Infection/agent specific (category)
Synonyms
Synonym
Dracontiasis, Dracontiasis guinea worm, Dracunculiases, Dracunculiasis, Dracunculoses, Dracunculosis, FIERY SERPENT INFECTION, guinea worm, Guinea worm disease, GUINEA WORM INFECT, GUINEA WORM INFECTION, guinea worm infestation, Infection by Dracunculus medinensis, Infection by Dracunculus medinensis (disorder), Infection Guinea Worm, infestation guinea worm, infestation Medina, Medina infestation, Synonym/Dracontiasis, Synonym/Fiery serpent infection, Synonym/Guinea worm infection
Treatment
Drug Therapy - Indication
RX/Mebendazole (Vermox)
RX/Metronidazol (Flagyl)
Surgical Procedures or Treatments
SX/Surgery
SX/Surgery Incision/Drainage
Definition

Infection with nematodes of the genus DRACUNCULUS; One or more worms may be seen at a time, with the legs and feet being the most commonly infected areas; Symptoms include pruritus, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or asthmatic attacks;

surgical removal is the usual treatment.

(Edit)

External Links Related to Dracunculiasis (Guinea worm)
Google
Wikipedia
Merck
Images
PubMed (National Library of Medicine)
NGC (National Guideline Clearinghouse)
Medscape (eMedicine)
Harrison's Online (accessmedicine)
NEJM (The New England Journal of Medicine)
Ads