Disease Information for Dextrocardia

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Clinical Manifestations
Signs & Symptoms
Cardiac Symptoms/Signs
Right chest cardiac heave/parasternal lift
Right heart border/right displaced/sign
Right ventricular heave
Single umbilical Artery Finding
Disease Progression
Course/Chronic disorder
Course/Chronic only
Demographics & Risk Factors
Established Disease Population
Patient/Situs inversus
Population Group
Child
Population/Pediatrics population
Sex & Age Groups
Population/Child
Population/Children/all
Diagnostic Test Results
EKG (ECG)
EKG/Q Wave in V6 (ECG)
EKG/R Wave V1 greater than S Wave (ECG)
EKG/S Wave V6 (ECG)
EKG/V3R R Waves/Right precordium (ECG)
EKG/Right-axis deviation (ECG)
EKG/Abnormal in children
X-RAY
Xray/Chest abnormal
Xray/Heart position/abnormal/Chest
Xray/Chest film/extrapulmonary abnormal
Xray/Chest/Lung fields/Abnormal
Xray/Mediastinal shift/Chest
Associated Diseases & Rule outs
Associated Disease & Complications
Dextrocardia
Situs inversus
Disease Mechanism & Classification
Class
CLASS/Cardiovascular (category)
CLASS/Heart disorder (ex)
Process
PROCESS/Congenital/developmental (category)
PROCESS/Anomalies/Deformities/Malformations (EX)
PROCESS/Acyanotic congenital heart disease (ex).
Definition

Location of the heart in the right hemithorax, with the apex directed to the right; often but not always with rest of chest and or situs inversus; Situs inversus is a condition in which the organs of the chest and abdomen are arranged in a perfect mirror image reversal of the normal positioning; Normal human development results in an asymmetrical arrangement of the organs within the chest and abdomen; Typically, the heart lies on the left side of the body (levocardia), and the lung on the left has two lobes while the lung on the right has three lobes; This normal arrangement is known as situs solitus; However, in about 1 in 8,500 people, the organs of the chest and abdomen are arranged in the exact opposite position: the heart is on the right (dextrocardia), as is the two-lobed lung, and three-lobed lung are on the left; Yet because this arrangement, called situs inversus, is a perfect mirror image, the relationship between the organs is not changed, so functional problems rarely occur; Early in the normal development of an embryo, the tube-like structure that becomes the heart forms a loop toward the left, identifying the left/right axis along which the other organs should be positioned; Although the mechanism that causes the heart loop to go left is not fully understood, at least one gene has been identified to have a role in this process; However, it is thought that many factors may be involved in causing situs inversus; Rarely, situs inversus can run in families, but most often it is an isolated and accidental event occurring in an individual for the first time in the family; Most people with situs inversus have no medical symptoms or complications resulting from the condition; Although only 3-5% of people with situs inversus have any type of functional heart defect, this is higher than the rate of heart defects in the general population, which is less than 1%;

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External Links Related to Dextrocardia
Google
Wikipedia
Merck
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PubMed (National Library of Medicine)
NGC (National Guideline Clearinghouse)
Medscape (eMedicine)
Harrison's Online (accessmedicine)
NEJM (The New England Journal of Medicine)
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