Disease Information for Cerebral AV malformation: Definition

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  • Arteriovenous Malformation; AVM ; Arteriovenous Malformation of the Brain; Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a congenital defect in which arteries and veins are tangled and not connected by capillaries; The lack of capillaries allows blood traveling through the abnormal vessels to flow rapidly and under high pressure and prevents the nutrient rich blood in the arteries from reaching the tissues; AVM can occur in many different parts of the body, but those located in the brain, brainstem and spinal cord (neurological AVM) can affect the entire body; [NORD 2005]------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Wyburn Mason Syndrome; Cerebroretinal Arteriovenous; Aneurysm; Wyburn-Mason Syndrome is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by blood vessel (vascular) malformations (ie, arteriovenous aneurysms) of the brain and the nerve-rich, innermost membranes of the eyes (retinas); "birthmarks" or pigmented, facial skin blemishes (facial nevi); and, in some cases, mental changes; An arteriovenous aneurysm is a vascular abnormality in which there is widening (dilation) of the walls of an artery and a vein, with abnormal blood flow (communication) between the blood vessels (ie, between the arterial and venous systems); [NORD 2005]------------------------------------------------------------------------------- congenital disorder of the blood vessels in the brain where there is an abnormal connection between arteries and veins.cerebral aneurysms can sometimes occur with avms but are a separate entity; AVM; Cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a congenital disorder; Large malformations may have enough blood flow through them to stress the pumping ability of the heart, especially in young patients; There are often no symptoms until complications occur; In many cases, symptoms are related to bleeding from the abnormal vessels, which are often fragile and lack the normal supportive structure of arteries and veins; Up to 70% of people with AVM present with bleeding from the malformation at some point; The risk of bleeding is approximately 2-4% per year; While there is some controversy regarding this, in general, small lesions are more likely to bleed than large ones; If a lesion bleeds once, the risk is increased that it will bleed again in the future; Intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhages are the most common presentations of cerebral arteriovenous malformation; Symptoms may also occur because of lack of blood flow to an area of the brain (ischemia), compression or distortion of brain tissue by large AVMs, or abnormal brain development in the area of the malformation; AVMs are slightly more common in males; Most often, symptoms develop before age 33 with about two-thirds presenting before the age of 40[UNIV MD MED website 2005

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