Disease Information for Avian influenza (H5N1) in human/zoonosis: Definition

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  • Fifteen subtypes of influenza virus are known to infect birds, thus providing an extensive reservoir of influenza viruses potentially circulating in bird populations; To date, all outbreaks of the highly pathogenic form have been caused by influenza A viruses of subtypes H5 and H7; Migratory waterfowl – most notably wild ducks – are the natural reservoir of avian influenza viruses, and these birds are also the most resistant to infection; Domestic poultry, including chickens and turkeys, are particularly susceptible to epidemics of rapidly fatal influenza;

    Direct or indirect contact of domestic flocks with wild migratory waterfowl has been implicated as a frequent cause of epidemics; Live bird markets have also played an important role in the spread of epidemics; Recent research has shown that viruses of low pathogenicity can, after circulation for sometimes short periods in a poultry population, mutate into highly pathogenic viruses; The quarantining of infected farms and destruction of infected or potentially exposed flocks are standard control measures aimed at preventing spread to other farms and eventual establishment of the virus in a country’s poultry population; Apart from being highly contagious, avian influenza viruses are readily transmitted from farm to farm by mechanical means, such as by contaminated equipment, vehicles, feed, cages, or clothing; Highly pathogenic viruses can survive for long periods in the environment, especially when temperatures are low; Stringent sanitary measures on farms can, however, confer some degree of protection; In the absence of prompt control measures backed by good surveillance, epidemics can last for years; For example, an epidemic of H5N2 avian influenza, which began in Mexico in 1992, started with low pathogenicity, evolved to the highly fatal form, and was not controlled until 1995; A constantly mutating virus:

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